Saturday, 28 January 2017

Sowerby Bridge Railway Station. A selection of Pictures.

The current Sowerby Bridge railway station was opened on September 1st 1876 and has seen many changes since that date.

The original station was further west along the line on the site of the current Tesco supermarket in the town approx. 0.4 miles from the current site. This station opened on the October 5th 1840 but was moved due to being too small and was considered to be too far away from the town centre. The new station opened on the junction for the Rishworth branch line which opened on august 5th 1878 and closed with the last train on September 1st 1958.
The original station building at this site was badly damaged by fire October 1978 and the demolition of this building took place in November 1980 leaving just one remaining part that became the ticket office until 1983, this is now the jubilee refreshment rooms and opened in 2008. The station is much smaller than originally and is currently unstaffed. There are 15 abandoned and derelict coal drops within 100 metres of the station that were built around 1875.
Branwell Bronte the brother of Charlotte, Emily, & Anne was employed here as assistant clerk in charge from October 1840 until March 1841. There is a blue plaque that commemorates this at the station.

I currently have 2 sets of pictures available taken at the station. The first set can be viewed on Clickasnap at, Sowerby Bridge Album. 

This picture can be viewed best quality, full size and without copyright tags on Clickasnap via the above link. I receive a small contributors fee for all views of over 10 seconds. This picture can also be purchased in various formats and frames from as little as £1 up to £150.

This picture can be viewed best quality, full size and without copyright tags on Clickasnap via the above link. I receive a small contributors fee for all views of over 10 seconds. This picture can also be purchased in various formats and frames from as little as £1 up to £87.

This picture can be viewed best quality, full size and without copyright tags on Clickasnap via the above link. I receive a small contributors fee for all views of over 10 seconds. This picture can also be purchased in various formats and frames from as little as £1 up to £87.

This picture can be viewed best quality, full size and without copyright tags on Clickasnap via the above link. I receive a small contributors fee for all views of over 10 seconds. This picture can also be purchased in various formats and frames from as little as £1 up to £121.

The prices vary due to type of frame, print, canvass or whether simply just a download.

The following short video was taken walking through the subway and can be seen here and also on my YouTube channel.
It was simply a mistake as the camera was switched on and running as I walked through for about 28 seconds, but hey waste not want not.

The other set of 10 pictures can be viewed on Flickr using the arrows or click to view full size on Flickr.

Sowerby Bridge Railway Station

 You can follow me on Facebook, Twitter, TumblrPinterest.and Clickasnap. Please take a moment to view my pictures on clickasnap as the photographer receives a small payment from them for any photos viewed over 10 seconds. You can now also purchase wall art, gifts, digital downloads and prints of my pictures listed on the clickasnap marketplace. If you would like to donate to my site or time you can do so by clicking the Paypal button below.

 

Thursday, 19 January 2017

Oxenhope to Haworth and Pictures In between

These pictures were taken whilst on a walk around Oxenhope and Haworth. The walk took me from the railway station at Oxenhope to Haworth station and back partially following the Railway Children route. This distance covered was about 3 miles.

The route I took runs alongside the Worth Valley Railway which was opened in 1867. The branch line was warmly received by the mill owners along the valley bottom. The line was closed in 1962 by British Rail and a preservation society was formed who reopened the Worth Valley Railway in 1968 as a heritage railway. The stations I saw along my walk were Haworth opened in 1847 and now the headquarters of the railway and Oxenhope which serves as the terminus for the line.

The pictures were taken on the 19th June 2015 with my Polaroid iS2132 Digital Camera.

Oxenhope to Haworth Following the Railway
Use the arrows to navigate the album or click any picture to view the pictures full size on Flickr
Oxenhope Station Goods Sheds.
The engine sheds at Oxenhope.
Tree Lined Path at Oxenhope.
Steam Train on the Keighley and Worth Valley Line.

Haworth Railway Station.
Haworth Station.

You can follow me on Facebook, Twitter, TumblrPinterest.and Clickasnap. Please take a moment to view my pictures on clickasnap as the photographer receives a small payment from them for any photos viewed over 10 seconds. You can now also purchase wall art, gifts, digital downloads and prints of my pictures listed on the clickasnap marketplace. If you would like to donate to my site or time you can do so by clicking the Paypal button below.

Sunday, 8 January 2017

Fartown Rugby and Cricket Grounds, Huddersfield.

Fartown originally opened as St John's Ground hosting Cricket matches from 1868. In 1875 Huddersfield St John's Cricket Club merged with Huddersfield Athletic club which had featured a rugby club since 1866. On the 2nd November 1878 the rugby ground had been developed enough to host the first game of rugby against the Manchester Rangers Rugby Club.

In 1895 rugby was split and the Huddersfield club joined the Northern Union which went on to become the game now known as rugby league. Fartown was there home ground until they moved to Leeds Road Stadium in 1992. The stadium had declined rapidly during the 1980's and after Huddersfield R.L.F.C moved out the stadium was demolished leaving only the floodlights, perimeter fencing, and pitch as a lasting legacy to a stadium that once held over 35,000 spectators for the 1947 Challenge Cup Semi Final. This information was taken from my previous blog Photographs by Colin.

These pictures were taken on the 18th June 2015 with my Polaroid iS2132 Digital Camera.

Fartown Rugby and Cricket Ground, Huddersfield.
Use the arrows to navigate the album of 9 pictures.
Beyond the Post's.
Taken from behind the posts, stood on what was the end terrace.
Overgrown Side Terrace at Fartown, Huddersfield.
The overgrown former side terrace.
Cricket Memorial Tower, Fartown, Huddersfield.
Cricket memorial clock tower. Sadly the clock was removed due to vandalism.

The following pictures show the grounds at other times in there history. These pictures are not owned by me so I will removed them if the owners request it. I wanted to show what the ground looked like in it's better days.

The cricket and football ground pictured in 1934. This image can be purchased at Britain from Above.
 The side terrace and looking across to the end terrace.
 The main stand.
 The side terrace.
The main stand and cricket pavilion.

These 4 pictures were taken from Huddersfield Heritage website. You can view and support there website at, Huddersfield Heriatge. Please take some time to view there website if you are interested and they would like me to remove the link and pictures please contact me and I will so.

You can follow me on Facebook, Twitter, TumblrPinterest.and Clickasnap. Please take a moment to view my pictures on clickasnap as the photographer receives a small payment from them for any photos viewed over 10 seconds. You can now also purchase wall art, gifts, digital downloads and prints of my pictures listed on the clickasnap marketplace. If you would like to donate to my site or time you can do so by clicking the Paypal button below.



There is now an additional album of 4 different pictures available to view and download for free on Clickasnap. Please take a moment to view the pictures there as I receive a small contributor's fee of currently $0.0014 for each view of over 10 seconds. Below are the links to each picture which will open in another window,

Pitch Side at Fartown

Supporters Stand Behind the Post's

Fartowns Overgrown Terrace

The Memorial Tower

Monday, 2 January 2017

Pictures from the Halifax High Level Railway.


The Remains of the Halifax High Level Railway Walk.
This selection of pictures was taken whilst walking the remains of the Halifax High Level Railway in February 2014.

The Halifax High Level was a short branch line running approx. 3.2 miles from Holmfield to Halifax St Pauls. Originally it was planned for the line to miss Halifax centre and allow trains to join the mainline south of Halifax but this idea was abandoned during the planning stage of the railway. The line opened on the 5th September 1890 and closed to passengers in January 1917.

The line featured 2 stations at Pellon and St Pauls, the 20 arch Wheatley Viaduct and the 749 metre long Wheatley Tunnel. The stations closeness to Halifax meant it was never popular with passengers as people undertaking a journey into Halifax had to travel by train to Holmfield Station change trains and then carry on into Halifax an additional journey time of about 20 minutes. The line closed completely on the 27th June 1960. Whilst large amounts of the former track bed have been closed off and the eastern portal of the Wheatley Tunnel and line near Holmefield has been infilled there are still a number of reminders that a railway once operated here.

The Arches Of Wheatley Viaduct.
Wheatley Viaduct.
Wood Lane Bridge, Former Railway Bridge on the Closed Halifax High Level Line.

Wood Lane Bridge near Ovenden Wood.
Stone Railway Embankment and High Tunnel. The Closed High Level Railway, Halifax.
Railway embankment and tunnel near Pellon Lane bridge.
Closed And Flooded Halifax High Level Railway Cutting.
This infilled section is just east of what was Keighley Road Bridge, behind Ovenden Park.
The Entrance to Wheatley Tunnel on the Closed Halifax High Level Railway.
The Western Portal to Wheatley Tunnel. Sadly the eastern portal is now infilled and covered with an housing estate. Would have made a fantastic walkway cycle route from Holmefield to Pellon through the tunnel and over the viaduct.

Click any of the photos to be taken to view the pictures full size and links to the whole album of 23 pictures.

You can follow me on Facebook, Twitter, TumblrPinterest.and Clickasnap. Please take a moment to view my pictures on clickasnap as the photographer receives a small payment from them for any photos viewed over 10 seconds. You can now also purchase wall art, gifts, digital downloads and prints of my pictures listed on the clickasnap marketplace. If you would like to donate to my site or time you can do so by clicking the Paypal button below.