Sunday, 4 June 2017

The Calder & Hebble Navigation. Halifax Branch Canal.


The Halifax Branch of the Calder & Hebble canal is an approx. half mile waterway that stretchers from Salterhebble junction / locks to the Watermill bar at Salterhebble Wharf.

The canal opened in 1828 and rose through 14 locks to end at Bailey Hall close to where the train station and Eureka museum now stands. The Halifax Branch fell in to disuse with the rise of firstly railways and the road transport and the section from Salterhebble Wharf to Bailey Hall was abandoned in 1942 and this has now become a cycle / pedestrian route known as the Hebble Trail with a little evidence that it was once a canal.

There is a little support for reopening this stretch of canal to help boost tourism in Halifax and a more enlightened council may look at these proposals but sadly with limited finance, and an unambitious local authority this is unlikely to ever happen.

There are a total of 13 pictures to view, they can be seen below or on Clickasnap where they are full size, resolution and un-watermarked. They were taken on the 9 April 2017 using a Nikon d3300 camera.

The start of the Halifax Branch, Salterhebble Locks are just to the
left of the picture out of sight. The bridge in the distance carries the
Halifax - Brighouse stretch of railway and crossers the canal which is
heading in the direction of Sowerby Bridge.


Wakefield Road Bridge. The canal brakes off to the left just beyond the bridge
through Salterhebble Locks in the direction of Brighouse.

The abutment to the right used to support a bridge that crossed the
canal here. The bridge has long since been removed.



Salterhebble Moorings can be seen in the distance. Tihs
is where the canal now ends.



To the right of the Watermill Bar is Salterhebble Tunnel. The canal continued through
 there and immediately entered lock 1 of the 14 on exiting the tunnel. The stone lock
walls can still be seen.

The modern day end of the Halifax Branch Canal. The Watermill Bar and
 Restaurant occupies what was the site of Salterhebble Mills. There is
also a Premier Inn hotel on the site,



Thanks for looking and please take a moment to share, all the pictures remain the copyright of Colin Green.